Change My Career? 4 Must-Have Tips for Deciding!

Change My Career? 4 Must-Have Tips for Deciding!

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change my career

“Should I change my career?” We’ve all wondered that. How do we know that we’re on the right path in life? The path we once thought was right may now seem completely wrong. How do we decide whether to change careers?

The answer is surprisingly obvious. We just have to close our eyes for five seconds and ask ourselves some questions. Are we thrilled about our jobs? Do we wake up excited about getting to work? Are we happy doing what we do? If the answer is no, then it’s no exaggeration that the time has come for us to get serious and change careers.

We all have times when we get frustrated with our jobs, but we’re wondering, “Will things actually improve if I choose to change my career?” Think about it.

And maybe we have reached a point in our working life when we need a change — desperately need a new challenge. If this is the case, then we should do something about it. Don’t just do what seems to be the right thing to do at the moment, nor do whatever others expect from us. Take some time alone and figure it out.

To help in deciding whether our new objective should be “change my career,” here are three frameworks, and then some resume advice. The frameworks will give clarity over the big decisions and help us make the right choices.

Change my career Framework 1: Reverse engineering.

Reverse engineering is one technique we can use so that we reverse the careers of people we look up to. By using LinkedIn, we can learn their job history and study how they get things done and where they are now. This method is so easy because it can be done online, from home!

But it’s not as simple as that. There’s something to be wary of. Some people who use this technique take that knowledge and then copy every exact move, every exact tactic someone successfully used. They do this without even understanding how and why it worked for that person.

Don’t ever do this. Don’t copy the experiences of others. Instead, learn from them.

We need to understand the person’s concepts, find out why the person did those things. We need to find out the circumstances. If we learn how to do it, then we have succeeded. Understanding the reasons that lead that person to those decisions can help us adapt them to our own situations in life.

Don’t be one of those people that let others make decisions for them. Don’t spend your whole life wondering, “What if I’d done things differently?” Instead, wonder right now, “Won’t things be fantastic if I change my career!”

It’s your decision. Don’t ask yourself where you went wrong and what would have happened if you’d done something differently. Instead, man up and decide it’s not too late to change your career.

Change my career Framework 2: Yes and yes.

A lot of people don’t realize how they let imagined barriers stop them from trying things. One example is an “extreme-reach barrier.” To be more precise, people assume that to succeed at something new in their lives, they would need to reach the full extent of it, and that seems impossible, so they decide to not even try. Or they assume that doing the new thing successfully would need such an extreme reach from them that they would have to exclude other things that they really want. Usually, these people can’t rationalize facts.Now contrast those people with top performers. Top performers don’t choose just one out of two; they do both; they’re “yes and yes.” Not only do they do both, but they do them better than anyone else!

Change my career Framework 3: Regret minimization.

Let’s get real now. Not one person ever graduated from college and couldn’t wait to go into the matrix. Not one person wants to spend all day just being a replaceable part of a machine. No one wants to do boring work all day, and have a boss who yells all day.

No one deserves to never get a pay raise because of the economy. The question is, How do people like this end up where they are, waiting for someone to acknowledge their hard work and eventually reward them? What are today’s soon-to-be top performers doing differently when starting out their careers?

It’s a choice, not destiny. Top performers aren’t at the very top by accident. They’re there thanks to all the smart moves they make and the strategies and maneuvers they use. That’s not the case with mediocre performers. The top performers chose, at least for a short part of their early lives, to use “change my career” as their current objective. So how do people like us choose all the right career moves? We first must accept that we also must make our life’s current objective to be “change my career.”

How to write a resume to change careers.

One thing is for sure: a resume should never be just a list of facts, no matter what kind of job we’re applying for. Our resumes should be intriguing and make the people reading them remember our names. We need to be remembered as much as possible, and we certainly won’t achieve that if we just list our education and job history. Let’s show what skills we’ve got!

Spend just a week trying to write the perfect resume. No, a week is not extreme, it’s just taking the time to go through every word. Every sentence has a powerful meaning.

When we get to the point that the resume is perfect, all we need to do next is finally make that decision to change careers, email the resume, and eagerly anticipate success!

Let’s do it!

Tell us about your career-change successes in the comments, and we’ll cheer each other on!

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4 Comments

  1. Great content here! So many people think about changing but don;t know how or what to do. This gives them great steps to do that. Thanks!

    1. Thanks Zach! Don’t forget to join my newsletter for more good (and free) stuff 🙂

  2. So many great tips here for career and life!

    1. Thank you for your feedback! Don’t forget to join my newsletter for more good (and free) stuff 🙂

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